www.springcourt.com   In 1936, Georges Grimmeisen, an amateur tennis player, designed a shoe to play on clay, the Spring Court... and the “tennis shoe” was born, quickly replacing sneakers on the court. But far beyond illustrating a technical revolution, the history of the brand bears the imprint of a century of dreams and turmoil.  Spring Court emerged in the heart of an incredible movement of openness and the popularization of athletics. Until that point, sports had been reserved for professionals or the wealthiest of families, but the events of 1936 marked a radical change in the concept of athletics. For the first time, people took pleasure in the game and discovered the benefits of physical exercise, and clay tennis courts became accessible to amateurs. While Spring Court outfitted professionals for over 40 years, the brand is, above all, a powerful symbol of the gateway to leisure sports.   The late 60s were a turning point in the story of the G2. The tennis shoe was diverted from its original purpose to become a symbol of personal affirmation. For the first time, athletic shoes were worn outside of the sports arena. We protested, danced, and lived in Spring Court shoes. The tennis shoe was embraced by rock stars, artists and the population as a whole. It was worn as a statement, both strong and discreet, of a refusal to conform. Certainly the most symbolic figure of this period was John Lennon, who lived in his Spring Courts, going as far as to wear them at his wedding with Yoko Ono and on the cover of his legendary Abbey Road album. The evolution of fashion perfectly embodies the cultural revival of the time. The sleek, smart style of the 50s was shaken up by a declaration of youth and urban values. Spring Court has remained an established accessory of this revolution.    Stockists include : Dover Street Market, Comme Des Garçons, Colette, Le Bon Marche, Isetan, Ron Herman, among others.   Picture : Spring Court x Jacquemus collaboration x SS14 show         
       
     
springcourt x jacquemus.jpg
       
     
sc x j.jpg
       
     
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 John Lennon wearing Spring Court
       
     
 John Lennon wearing Spring Court
       
     
 Jane Birkin wearing Spring Court
       
     
 David Hockney wearing Spring Court
       
     
  www.springcourt.com   In 1936, Georges Grimmeisen, an amateur tennis player, designed a shoe to play on clay, the Spring Court... and the “tennis shoe” was born, quickly replacing sneakers on the court. But far beyond illustrating a technical revolution, the history of the brand bears the imprint of a century of dreams and turmoil.  Spring Court emerged in the heart of an incredible movement of openness and the popularization of athletics. Until that point, sports had been reserved for professionals or the wealthiest of families, but the events of 1936 marked a radical change in the concept of athletics. For the first time, people took pleasure in the game and discovered the benefits of physical exercise, and clay tennis courts became accessible to amateurs. While Spring Court outfitted professionals for over 40 years, the brand is, above all, a powerful symbol of the gateway to leisure sports.   The late 60s were a turning point in the story of the G2. The tennis shoe was diverted from its original purpose to become a symbol of personal affirmation. For the first time, athletic shoes were worn outside of the sports arena. We protested, danced, and lived in Spring Court shoes. The tennis shoe was embraced by rock stars, artists and the population as a whole. It was worn as a statement, both strong and discreet, of a refusal to conform. Certainly the most symbolic figure of this period was John Lennon, who lived in his Spring Courts, going as far as to wear them at his wedding with Yoko Ono and on the cover of his legendary Abbey Road album. The evolution of fashion perfectly embodies the cultural revival of the time. The sleek, smart style of the 50s was shaken up by a declaration of youth and urban values. Spring Court has remained an established accessory of this revolution.    Stockists include : Dover Street Market, Comme Des Garçons, Colette, Le Bon Marche, Isetan, Ron Herman, among others.   Picture : Spring Court x Jacquemus collaboration x SS14 show         
       
     

www.springcourt.com

In 1936, Georges Grimmeisen, an amateur tennis player, designed a shoe to play on clay, the Spring Court... and the “tennis shoe” was born, quickly replacing sneakers on the court. But far beyond illustrating a technical revolution, the history of the brand bears the imprint of a century of dreams and turmoil.

Spring Court emerged in the heart of an incredible movement of openness and the popularization of athletics. Until that point, sports had been reserved for professionals or the wealthiest of families, but the events of 1936 marked a radical change in the concept of athletics. For the first time, people took pleasure in the game and discovered the benefits of physical exercise, and clay tennis courts became accessible to amateurs. While Spring Court outfitted professionals for over 40 years, the brand is, above all, a powerful symbol of the gateway to leisure sports. 

The late 60s were a turning point in the story of the G2. The tennis shoe was diverted from its original purpose to become a symbol of personal affirmation. For the first time, athletic shoes were worn outside of the sports arena. We protested, danced, and lived in Spring Court shoes. The tennis shoe was embraced by rock stars, artists and the population as a whole. It was worn as a statement, both strong and discreet, of a refusal to conform. Certainly the most symbolic figure of this period was John Lennon, who lived in his Spring Courts, going as far as to wear them at his wedding with Yoko Ono and on the cover of his legendary Abbey Road album. The evolution of fashion perfectly embodies the cultural revival of the time. The sleek, smart style of the 50s was shaken up by a declaration of youth and urban values. Spring Court has remained an established accessory of this revolution. 

Stockists include: Dover Street Market, Comme Des Garçons, Colette, Le Bon Marche, Isetan, Ron Herman, among others.

Picture: Spring Court x Jacquemus collaboration x SS14 show

 

 

 

springcourt x jacquemus.jpg
       
     
sc x j.jpg
       
     
sc x jcq.jpg
       
     
sc x jc.jpg
       
     
 John Lennon wearing Spring Court
       
     

John Lennon wearing Spring Court

 John Lennon wearing Spring Court
       
     

John Lennon wearing Spring Court

 Jane Birkin wearing Spring Court
       
     

Jane Birkin wearing Spring Court

 David Hockney wearing Spring Court
       
     

David Hockney wearing Spring Court